TV Antennas and Miscellaneous Items


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Antennas

1955 RCA Servicemen's Achievement Award Statue

This plastic statue is a man holding the atmoic symbol with an RCA vacuum tube in the center of the symbol.

The statue stands about 12" tall (without the base).

One of these statues is silver colored; the other statue has green, brown, and purple swirls.

Note: These two statues are missing the original plastic base (with the award inscription).

 

Vintage Rembrandt TV Antenna

I won this antenna on ebay. It is an uncommon design that I like.

 

Vintage TV Antenna

This interesting antenna is probably from the mid-1950s. It has no manufacturer's marking that I can find. It has a heavy cast iron base and an adjustment knob positioned in the center of two geodesic-shaped balls on either side. Both the rabbit ears and the center antenna section are adjustable.

 

TV Antenna

I won this antenna on ebay. I had been looking for this particular antenna for over a year.

It is an American 5-K Indoor TV tenna (probably from the mid-1950s).

 

Channel Master Rabbit Ears

The two circular wires give these rabbit ears a particularly nice design. The base is cast iron and Bakelite.

 

Channel King Retractable Antenna

These clever antennas extend (up to 42 inches) and retract by turning the round knob on the front of the plastic cabinet. These came in several different colors of plastic and still work very well today.

 

Delta Beam Antenna

This unusual antenna has rabbit ears that are hinged in the middle (allowing them to fold down or up). Two coiled wires in the middle section of the antenna apparently improve reception.

I have three of these antennas, including the less common model with a lighted base.

 

Unusual TV Antenna

This odd-looking antenna made by the Hi-Lo Antenna Corp. is about 32" wide. I thought it would look fun on top of a vintage TV.

 

GE "Ro-To" TV Antenna

Circular antennas were made by various manufacturers in the late-1940s, but this variety with the open framework is less common.

 

Miscellaneous Items

RCA U-70 UHF Converter

This RCA unit looks more like a radio than a UHF converter. Initially, all TV stations operated using the VHF frequency. But, in 1953, Portland was the first city in the nation to begin broadcasting using the UHF frequency. Early TVs were not designed to receive UHF broadcasts; consequently, UHF converters were used to connect between the TV and the VHF antenna allowing the TV to receive both VHF and UHF signals.

 

1939 New York World's Fair RCA Exhibit Card

This souvenir card (I believe) was given to people visiting the RCA exhibit to certify that they had been broadcast on television (which was being introduced and demonstrated at the fair). Typically, the person's name was handwritten on the card.

Click the card image to see both the front and the back of the card.

 

Replacement Picture Tubes

If you own a bunch of working vintage TVs you need some replacement picture tubes in various sizes handy.

This tube is a 12LP4, shown with the harness that Philco used to mount CRTs to the cabinet. I also have spare 7JP4, 10BP4, 10FP4, 12JP4, 12KP4 CRTs for future use (and not for sale).

 

1950s Plastic Kraft TV Cameraman

I couldn't resist this TV-related vintage toy to put on top of one of my vintage TVs. He stands about 4" tall and swivels on the base.

I thought he was so cute that I bought a second one on ebay a week after buying the first one.

 

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